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Font of the Week

FOTW Frutiger

Swiss typographer Adrian Frutiger was commissioned by the airport in Paris to create new signage for directional purposes. It was important to create a highly legible font for the airport to use, and thus Frutiger was born! Frutiger’s modern yet casual look has made it a favorite for companies like Amtrak, Panda Express, and Polaroid.


Our Font of the Week images are created by Emily Clark, an Expert Production Artist at CustomInk and a self-declared font addict. Font of the Week fuels Emily’s passion to research and learn more about beloved typefaces like Frutiger. What font should Emily feature next? Sound off in the comments below!

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lucida-sans-font-of-the-week

Lucida Bright is one of many in the Lucida font family. Designers Charles Bigelow and Kris Holmes created the fun and easy to read family in 1993 for uses in a variety of print ranging from magazines to newsletters. The family was aptly named “Lucida” as a reference to the easily understood format and “lucid” nature. You may recognize Lucida Bright from it’s home in the Microsoft Office suite.


Our Font of the Week images are created by Emily Clark, an Expert Production Artist at CustomInk and a self-declared font addict. Font of the Week fuels Emily’s passion to research and learn more about beloved typefaces like Lucida Bright. What font should Emily feature next? Sound off in the comments below!

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jenson-font-of-the-week

Perhaps one of the oldest fonts, Jenson is said to be the “first pure Roman Typeface”. It was originally created by Nicolas Jenson in 1470, but was given a revival by Ernst Detterer in 1923. Adobe Jenson, the font we’ve come to know and love, was born again in 1996 at the hands of Robert Slimbach. Jenson is known for it’s versatility, as it is looks great at any size!


Our Font of the Week images are created by Emily Clark, an Expert Production Artist at CustomInk and a self-declared font addict. Font of the Week fuels Emily’s passion to research and learn more about beloved typefaces like Jenson. What font should Emily feature next? Sound off in the comments below!

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century-gothic-font-of-the-week

Century Gothic was born in 1991. This geometric sans serif (meaning a font that lacks serifs at the end of it’s strokes) was released by Monotype Imaging. Century Gothic is a call back to the International Typeface Corporation’s “Avant Garde” and is often times used as a replacement for the font created in 1970. Century Gothic is considered a “safe” font because it translates across so many different programs with ease.


Our Font of the Week images are created by Emily Clark, an Expert Production Artist at CustomInk and a self-declared font addict. Font of the Week fuels Emily’s passion to research and learn more about beloved typefaces like Century Gothic. What font should Emily feature next? Sound off in the comments below!

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caslon-antique-font-of-the-week

Caslon Antique was created by Berne Nadal in 1894 to pay homage to the metal type printers that were used over and over again, causing the elements to become damaged and chipped. Caslon Antique bares no relation to the popular Caslon font family and was only named such in an attempt to boost it’s popularity. Where have you seen this spooky font? Between plays, musicals, and video games, you’re sure to have seen Caslon Antique a time or two.


Our Font of the Week images are created by Emily Clark, an Expert Production Artist at CustomInk and a self-declared font addict. Font of the Week fuels Emily’s passion to research and learn more about beloved typefaces like Caslon Antique. What font should Emily feature next? Sound off in the comments below!

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