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Font of the Week

Univers was created by Adrian Frutiger in 1954 as a neo-grotesque sans-serif. Does Univers look familiar? It was part of a move to break away from super popular geometric font trends. Univers, Helvetica, and Folio all share similar nuances as a result of this breakaway. Each of these fonts borrows from the 1898 type face Akzidenz-Grotesk, which is a big reason the three are often mistaken for one another.


Our Font of the Week images are created by Emily Clark, an Expert Production Artist at CustomInk and a self-declared font addict. Font of the Week fuels Emily’s passion to research and learn more about beloved typefaces like Univers. What font should Emily feature next? Sound off in the comments below!

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Trebuchet was created in 1996 for Microsoft by Vincent Connare, the mastermind behind the widely known Comic Sans. Trebuchet is named after the siege engines that were used to break down city walls during Medieval times. Nowadays, the familiar looking font has made a home for itself as one of the most popular fonts used on webpages.

Want to know more about typographer Vincent Connare? Check out CustomInk’s interview with the designer.


Our Font of the Week images are created by Emily Clark, an Expert Production Artist at CustomInk and a self-declared font addict. Font of the Week fuels Emily’s passion to research and learn more about beloved typefaces like Trebuchet. What font should Emily feature next? Sound off in the comments below!

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The font face Sabon was released in the 1960s as both Linotype and Monotype compatible. Jan Tschichold created this Old Style Serif in response to Stempel Foundry’s request to create a face that would match across both mediums. In honor of Garamond’s Roman typeface (the font that inspired this uniform print-friendly version), Tschichold named it after creator Jacques Sabon. And the rest they say, is history.


Our Font of the Week images are created by Emily Clark, an Expert Production Artist at CustomInk and a self-declared font addict. Font of the Week fuels Emily’s passion to research and learn more about beloved typefaces like Sabon. What font should Emily feature next? Sound off in the comments below!

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Americana was designed by Richard Isbell in 1965 to honor our country’s upcoming bicentennial. With extremely high x-heights, triangular serifs, and airy spacing, Americana is perfect for advertising. Isbell’s creation of such a versatile typeface means Americana works great for not only large print needs, but small as well.


Our Font of the Week images are created by Emily Clark, an Expert Production Artist at CustomInk and a self-declared font addict. Font of the Week fuels Emily’s passion to research and learn more about beloved typefaces like Americana. What font should Emily feature next? Sound off in the comments below!

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Rockwell is a Monotype font created by Frank Hinman Pierpont in 1934. Rockwell was in part inspired by a font created twenty years earlier, Litho Antique. Rockwell’s most recognizable letter is the “Qq” with it’s lengthy tail making it quite recognizable. Why might you recognize Rockwell? It’s used in the IBM and Heineken logos.


Our Font of the Week images are created by Emily Clark, an Expert Production Artist at CustomInk and a self-declared font addict. Font of the Week fuels Emily’s passion to research and learn more about beloved typefaces like Rockwell. What font should Emily feature next? Sound off in the comments below!

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