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Say what? You love t-shirts too? What about iconic sayings t-shirts? You might be a fan of our 100 most iconic t-shirts of all time list, so now we’ve taken a closer look at our list and broken them down by genre. From 90s brands to quirky movie characters, our most iconic sayings t-shirts have something for everyone, and might even inspire you to create a saying tee of your own.

20. YOLO


A mantra started by the rapper Drake, YOLO (an acronym for “You Only Live Once”) was a nominee for 2012 Word of the Year by the American Dialect Society. It can now be seen on t-shirts sold by street vendors all over the country. While many have embraced the phrase, (and lovingly slapped it on a t-shirt), many find it, and the meaning behind it, “stupid”. So much so that Drake apologized for coining the term on Saturday Night Live in 2014, saying he didn’t know our “annoying friends and coworkers” would use it so much.

19. Coed Naked


Famous for turning any sport or activity into one you can do in the buff, these shirts and their slogans were popular amongst high school & college athletes in the ’80s and ’90s. Coed Naked was trademarked in 1991, and was initially popular at the University of New Hampshire, creator Scott MacHardy’s alma mater. MacHardy has said that while inappropriate catchphrases wouldn’t be that big of a deal now, back then the shirts made people uncomfortable. Coed Naked tees got so popular that eventually they were banned by school dress codes.

18. Don’t Mess With Texas


From anti-littering campaign to unofficial state motto, “Don’t Mess with Texas” is proof that a great slogan can take on a life of its own. Commissioned by the Texas Department of Transportation in 1985, the saying has grown to cult popularity today. In 1998, LeAnn Rimes starred in an ad for the campaign. At the time, 96 percent of Texans had heard of “Don’t Mess with Texas,” but only 61 percent understood the phrase meant “don’t litter”.

17. Choose Life


Worn by Wham! in its “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go” video, the design was an early foray into social messaging on t-shirts. It also appeared in Queen’s video for “Hammer to Fall”. Designed by Katharine Hamnett to fight back against drug abuse and suicide, this & other Hamnett designs fused social issues and fashion.

16. Don’t Worry, Be Happy


“Don’t Worry, Be Happy” was sung by Bobby McFerrin in September 1988, and became the first a cappella song to reach number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The saying, and song, became the source of a political snafu when George H.W. Bush used it in his campaign without permission. This caused McFerrin to speak out against Bush and pull the song from his show line up. Maybe not so happy?

15. I Survived…


If you can eat it, ride it, or visit it, chances are you can get an “I Survived …” t-shirt at the gift shop. This iconic design has spawned infinite incarnations for just about any experience that doesn’t kill you. Some notable classics? “I Survived the Tower of Terror,” along with shirts nodding to spring break and political administrations.

14. We Can Do It!


Commissioned by Westinghouse Company, J. Howard Miller created a series of posters to help boost morale during WWII. Commonly conflated with Norman Rockwell’s Saturday Evening Post cover featuring Rosie the Riveter, both have become iconic images for WWII and women’s rights. The image not only led to women working, but to hundreds of thousands of women joining the Armed Forces. In May 1942, Congress instituted the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps, later known as the Women’s Army Corps. The image has resurfaced recently as “nevertheless, she persisted” t-shirts gain popularity.

13. Jesus is My Homeboy


As inspiration for fashion photographer David LaChapelle’s Last Supper art exhibit, the Jesus is my Homeboy shirt is quite captivating. While LaChapelle is known for making the shirt famous, Van Zan Frater vows he is the shirt’s original creator. He says the shirt was inspired by a time he was jumped by a gang in LA, and was sure he’d die. But he threw his hands up and said “Jesus is my homeboy,” and the gang members repeated it, then let him go. So he felt compelled to share the message—on t-shirts.

12. Where’s the Beef?


Octogenarian Clara Peller had some major beef (or lack thereof) with the size of burger patties. You knew when a simple slogan rose to enter presidential politics that Wendy’s was onto something. Thecommercial was created by the old Dancer Fitzgerald Sample agency. A year after the commercial aired, Wendy’s and Teller parted ways, since she appeared in a Prego sauce commercial saying “I found it!”—Wendy’s thought the only place she could find the beef was with them. Wendy’s answered the beefy question in 2011, when they launched a new line of burgers and said “here’s the beef!”

11. Make 7 Up Yours


The front: Make 7. The back: Up Yours. This juvenile play on the “Un-Cola” slogan of the time (Make 7Up Yours) made this shirt good for a chuckle and a smile. From 1999-2005, this Y2K campaign by ad agency Young & Rubicam, featured Orlando Jones walking around telling everyone to “Make 7 Up Yours,” to which he received…less than friendly responses.

10. No Fear


Created in 1989 by NASCAR driver Mark Simo, the No Fear brand was quite popular in the mid ’90s during the rise of extreme sports. No Fear shirts show off catchy slogans about living life on the edge and defying death. Pair that with a sharp-eyed, intense logo, and you had yourself quite the t-shirt trend. In 2000,the brand opened its first retail store, and in 2003 launched the No Fear energy drink.

9. Have a Nice Day


The road to iconic tee was a lot longer than Forrest’s run, starting in 1943 as a Swedish film promo and blossoming as the novelty brainchild of two guys from Philly as “Have a Happy Day” in 1972. Somehow “happy” later got switched to “nice.” But, some of us might believe that the true inspiration was the struggling t-shirt salesman in Forrest Gump, who wanted to put Forrest’s face on a t-shirt but couldn’t draw very well. Instead, he was inspired by a mud smiley face created by Forrest wiping his face off, and according to Gump, “he made a lot of money.”

8. Keep Calm and Carry On


During WWII, the British Government needed morale boosting posters to display across the country. The first two posters “Your Courage, Your Cheerfulness, Your Resolution Will Bring us to Victory,” and “Freedom is in Peril” were posted on public transit, in shop windows, and basically everywhere else. The third, “Keep Calm and Carry On,” was only meant to be used if Germany invaded Britain, which never happened. It was thought that the posters were destroyed, but they were discovered in a pile of old books in 2000. The Keep Calm and Carry On phrase speaks to a new generation of beleaguered masses, and has become a favorite for mugs, posters, and of course, t-shirts.

7. Kiss Me I’m Irish


Popular on St. Paddy’s Day, the phrase is a nod to the Blarney Stone, since legend says kissing it will bring you good luck. The next best thing? An Irish person! Ancesty.com says there are 2 stories about kissing the stone with luck. First, the builder of Blarney Castle needed some luck in a lawsuit in the 1440s. The goddess of love told him to kiss a stone, so he did, and he won! Another story says that Cormac Teige McCarthy needed to convince Queen Elizabeth I to keep his land. He kissed the stone and it gave him the gift of eloquent speech—so he was able to convince her to keep his land!

6. I’m With Stupid


… and it was genius. The grandaddy of the directional t-shirt elicited a symphony of juvenile snickers at the expense of thousands of unsuspecting bystanders.

5. …And All I Got Was This Lousy T-shirt


As custom t-shirts gained popularity as destination-travel gifts, a humorous backlash developed in the form of this saying on t-shirts for nearly every spot imaginable.

4. Just Do It – Nike


Advertising exec Dan Wieden credits his inspiration for this iconic advertising campaign to the final words of a convict before execution. Hey! If he can face the firing squad, you can definitely run that marathon. On a positive note, the Just Do It campaign may have just saved Nike. The brand was going through tough times and had laid of 20 percent of its workers when the slogan was launched. In the decade that followed, Nike’s sales increased by 1000 percent.

3. Frankie Say Relax


To overrule censoring of the Frankie Goes to Hollywood song “Relax,” in 1984, label owner Paul Morley printed “FRANKIE SAY RELAX” on t-shirts. It has become something of an graphical inspiration in recent years, with block letter tees becoming all the rage. Morley has said that the design was based on Katharine Hamnett’s t-shirts—like “CHOOSE LIFE,” also on this list.

2. Vote for Pedro


Wildly popular after the cult hit movie Napoleon Dynamite was released in 2004, the Vote for Pedro shirt has since gained mass appeal. While it’s a relatively simple design on a white/black ringer tee, the movie created quite a visual imprint during Napoleon’s famous dance scene. The shirt has been created by many stores for resale, but those looking to make their own can use the font “Cooper Black” to get that authentic look.

1. I ♥ NY


In an almost eureka moment, designer Milton Glaser sketched “I ♥ NY” on a napkin in the 1970s. The logo was used to promote tourism in New York, at a time when the city was plagued with crime and losing visitors. The New York State Department of Economic Development owns the trademark to the logo, and it’s still used to promote NYC and New York State. The classic font used is American Typewriter. The t-shirt has become one of the most worn t-shirts of all time—and our most iconic!

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Here at CustomInk, we love custom t-shirts. But sometimes, we need to bow down to the brands that started t-shirt trends. You might be a fan of our 100 most iconic t-shirts of all time list, so now we’ve taken a closer look at some of the genres within this list. From school spirit to sports team, our most iconic brand t-shirts have something for everyone, and might even inspire you to create a brand tee of your own.

24. Stussy


This streetwear brand got its start in 1980 by Shawn Stussy after he put his last name on t-shirts to promote his custom surfboards. The signature was inspired by the wayhe’d write on his boards with a broad tip marker. He and his business partner, Frank Sinatra Jr. (no relation to the singer) had no idea what an icon their streetwear brand would become. Thirty-plus years later, the brand is still popular—just more mainstream and a tad less edgy.

23. Big Dogs


Founded in 1983, the Big Dogs brand of clothing became really BIG in the early ’90s with the release of their racy slogan t-shirts. Their first slogan “Man, these puppies are BIG” says it all. At their peak, the brand had 220 stores across the US. Their best selling t-shirt was a South Park parody called “South Bark”—one that their sportswear director Steve Dawson said “outsold everything.” Ruff, ruff.

22. FBI


Whether for Federal Bureau of Investigation enthusiasts or Female Body Inspectors (yes, that is the other meaning), these shirts are sold ALL OVER the place. And bought by many a tourist.

21. Property of…


This tee is a classic case of function becomes fashion. In 1932, the football staff at USC wanted to create a shirt that would stop shoulder pads from chafing the players’ skin. USC printed “Property of USC” on these t-shirts to prevent theft. Instead, they became popular with students. Decades later, “Property of…” t-shirts are standard fare in most college bookstores, um, we mean websites.

20. Notre Dame


French in name, Irish in spirit, the University of Notre Dame’s Fighting Irish football team is legendary. Formed in 1887, the team was named Forbes most valuable college football contingent in 2007. The famous Notre Dame leprechaun, however, was created in 1964 by sports artist Theodore W. Drake for $50.

19. Brew Thru


An East Coast favorite from the Outer Banks, NC, this drive-thru beer store has sold over 4 million colorful shirts since they opened in 1977—each year releasing a unique one. And yes, we just said “drive-thru beer store.” According to Brew Thru, they started coming out with designs in addition to their annual shirt, which showcased lighthouses or popular trends. The annual shirt is still the biggest seller though, accounting for about half of the 100,000 shirts sold every summer. They often see visitors purchase 15-20 t-shirts at a time!

18. Planet Hollywood


A themed restaurant chain backed by the Hollywood action elite? What could go wrong? Founded by Robert Earl with partners Bruce Willis and Sylvester Stallone, Planet Hollywood opened in 1991 in New York City. While over 100 locations have closed, 6 are still operating by a theme park near you.

17. Hulkamania


An icon in the ring, and an icon on our list, Hulk Hogan has defined a segment of popular culture. He made his debut in the WWF in 1980, and used the stage name “Hulk” due to his resemblance to the Incredible Hulk character. His true superstardom began after a big win in 1984, and the fan frenzy that ensued became “Hulkamania”. Hogan spearheaded an entire genre of entertainment, which spanned from TV to movies to apparel (mostly of the ripped variety).

16. Hello, Kitty!


Hello, Japan. Hello, 1974. Hello, 5 billion dollar media empire. It’s Hello Kitty! For over 40 years, the Hello Kitty! brand has gone global with t-shirts and apparel being a huge part of its success. Owned by Japanese company Sanrio, the famous kitty has appeared on everything from coin purses, to pencils, to toaster ovens. Today, Sanrio even sells Hello Kitty motor oil, a smart car, and wine—we’ll drink to that…or cat?

15. John Deere


The gold standard in tractors and farm equipment, John Deere has made the colors green & yellow their own with their iconic logo. The leaping deer trademark has been a part of the brand for over 135 years. The first logo was created in 1876, and has evolved over the years from a sketch of a deer leaping over a log, to a solid silhouette of a deer leaping. In 2000, the logo changed from a deer leaping downward, to a deer leaping upward. The brand has become a fashion statement of farm-folk and country lovers alike, yee haw!

14. French Connection United Kingdom (fcuk)


A global fashion retailer based in London, French Connection hit marketing gold when they added the letters “UK” for the United Kingdom to the company letters “FC”. The idea was a bit of a happy accident, when the company opened a location in Hong Kong. Faxes between the London and Hong Kong locations were labeled “FCHK” and “FCUK.” In 2016, the brand re-launched their 90s cult favorite tees, and still sell them on their website today. We know it’s controversial, but it sure is eye-catching.

13. Boston Red Sox


Yankees fans will squirm, but the Red Socks are a combination of cute and cool that mixed with their legendary underdog story, make this a shirt any fan would wear. The Red Sox have had their share of logos over the years, and most are still seen on fan gear. But since 2009, a simple pair of red socks with a white heel and toe have been the official logo, with the alternative or cap logo being the iconic Boston “B.”

12. Make 7 Up Yours


The front: Make 7. The back: Up Yours. This juvenile play on the “Un-Cola” slogan of the time (Make 7Up Yours) made this shirt good for a chuckle and a smile. From 1999-2005, this Y2K campaign by ad agency Young & Rubicam, featured Orlando Jones walking around telling everyone to “Make 7 Up Yours,” to which he received…less than friendly responses.

11. adidas


A portmanteau of founder’s name Adi Dassler, ADIDAS was founded in Germany and went on to become one of the world’s foremost sporting brands. You can still believe it stands for All Day I Dream About Sports—we won’t tell anyone. In 1949, Dassler registered the “Adi Dassler adidas Sportschuhfabrik” and began working with just 47 employees. The brand attributes its success to a “miracle” — a German national football team won while wearing screw-in-studs on football boots—or cleats. It’s had partnerships with FIFA—providing the World Cup ball since 1970, and was even a favorite brand of Run DMC.

10. Peace Frogs


Peace Frogs originally started as a company selling a line of multi-colored international flag shorts. The reason they adopted the frog logo was because the frog just so happens to be recognized as a symbol of peace and good luck. The brand says that to its customers, Peace Frogs isn’t an icon, but a state of mind—for hippies of all ages and sizes.

9. Jack Daniels


The historic Tennessee Whiskey is not only good for drinking and BBQ marinades — its iconic label is pretty cool to wear on your chest too. Until the 1950s, Jack Daniel’s sales depended mostly on word of mouth, and became a favorite of high-profile people like Winston Churchill and Frank Sinatra, who called it the “nectar of the gods”. The first time the brand even advertised, it was a small black and white ad. Today, the black and white logo remains a classic, especially when you’re looking for a Jack and Coke.

8. Hypercolor


Seattle-based sportswear company Generra created the Hypercolor t-shirt, which became a household and school hallway staple in the early 90s. At its peak in early 1991, the company sold $50 million worth of color changing t-shirts, shorts, pants, and more in a four-month period. The shirts were dyed twice, once with a permanent color and again with a thermochromic dye that would change colors when it got warm. But, you had to be careful when you washed your Hypercolor tee, otherwise it might turn a mucky brown color in the wash. Recently, some brands tried to bring back the color-changing fad, but it didn’t bounce back.

7. Coca-Cola


As one of the most recognizable brands in the world, it’s not surprising a Coca-Cola shirt made our list. With its script logo iconic in its own right, Coke has been able to spawn a collection of t-shirts around the world that never seem to go out of fashion. The name was actually thought of by creator John Smith Pemberton’s bookkeeper, Frank Robinson. He said that the two Cs would look good in advertisements. Robinson is also who designed the famous script logo. Throughout the years the logo has gotten small tweaks, like extra swirls or a modified tail, and since 1947, has been associated with the color red. But even today, through a 125th anniversary and the “you name it” campaign with names printed on the drink, the brand has stuck with its script roots.

6. I Want My MTV


Over 30 years ago, television was like the town from Footloose—void of rock music and ‘80s dancing. Enter: MTV. Over the past three decades MTV revolutionized the airwaves, creating an industry for everything from music videos to bus-based dating shows. Frank Olinsky, one of the designers of the MTV logo back in 1981, says that one of the final revisions to the logo was putting “music television” under the “M”. This was changed in 2010, when the words were removed from the logo for good.

5. Harley Davidson


What once became synonymous with “Hell’s Angels” turned into a t-shirt for every man, symbolizing the freedom of the open road—on weekends of course, and as long as he was back in time for dinner and to put the kids to bed. It began with 21-year-old William S. Harley in 1901, when he completed his blueprint drawing of an engine designed to fit a bicycle. In 1910, the famous “Bar & Shield” logo was used for the first time, and was trademarked a year later. Unlike most historic logos, this one has remained pretty much the same from the start.

4. ARMY


Army followed the Navy by introducing the “quarter sleeve” shirt, which was first included as standard-issue gear in the Navy in 1913. But we can’t talk about this iconic ARMY tee without giving a nod to to armed forces, who created the popularity of the t-shirt itself. As part of the uniform, the t-shirt gained popularity, eventually becoming an official English word, and going on to become a workwear staple for mechanics, miners, farmers, and more.

3. Just Do It – Nike


Advertising exec Dan Wieden credits his inspiration for this iconic advertising campaign to the final words of a convict before execution. Hey! If he can face the firing squad, you can definitely run that marathon. On a positive note, the Just Do It campaign may have just saved Nike. The brand was going through tough times and had laid of 20 percent of its workers when the slogan was launched. In the decade that followed, Nike’s sales increased by 1000 percent.

2. D.A.R.E


In 1983, the International Drug Abuse Resistance Education program spread across the United States, providing free t-shirts, pens, and other branded gear to program graduates. The tees inadvertently turned into sleepwear for an entire generation of school kids, and still bring feelings of nostalgia to 90s kids who see the italicized logo, sometimes in fun neon colors. You can still find D.A.R.E. merchandise for sale online, however the D.A.R.E. program has some strict rules when it comes to use of the trademark.

1. Hard Rock Cafe


If you’ve done any traveling, you’ve probably seen someone wearing a Hard Rock Cafe t-shirt at some point. Each Hard Rock Cafe, along with its vast array of music memorabilia, typically sells a shirt with its city name in their gift shop. With over 100 restaurants having opened up all over the world, these shirts have become something of a collectible over the years. The popularity of the t-shirt happend by accident. According to Thrillist, Hard Rock’s owners sponsored a soccer team in 1974, and gave them logo t-shirts. There were extra, so they brought them back to the cafe to give to customers, and they became a hit!

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There’s nothing like kicking back to watch your favorite TV show. Except maybe bringing it to life on a t-shirt!. You might be a fan of our 100 most iconic t-shirts of all time list, so now we’ve taken a closer look at some of the genres within this list, like TV show tees. From the Max to the Simpsons, our most iconic TV show t-shirts pack a nostalgic punch, and might even inspire you to create a TV show tee of your own.

15. The Max


No restaurant saw more acid-wash jeans, crop tops, or charity dances than “the Max” on the teen TV hit “Saved By the Bell.” This is one of many t-shirts that became real-world iconic because of its fictional prominence in pop culture. Famously worn by Kelly Kapowski, this red tee was her waitress uniform at the favorite campus spot. It’s still such an icon that pop up “The Max” shops still appear in major cities.

14. Rainbow Brite


Isn’t she just adorable? A cartoon about psychedelic color kids, talking rainbow horses, and whatever Twink was. You don’t get much more ’80s than Rainbow Brite. The t-shirt gained fame more from an ironic-teen movement than actual fandom. Owned by Hallmark Cards, the original characters were designed by artist G.G. Santiago.

13. Cookie Monster


C is for COOKIE, that’s good enough for me. T is for T-SHIRT, iconic it will be. Born in 1966, Sesame Street’s Cookie Monster has been craving carbs for 46 years, with no end in sight. Created by Jim Hansen, Cookie Monster, or “Sid” first appeared in a food commercial, and later went on to become one of our favorite mummers. Cookie Monster tees are sold by many large retailers, such as Target and Walmart.

12. Mighty Mouse


Here he comes to save the day! Airing off and on from 1942 to 1987, this super-powered rodent fought everything from alley cats to animated Nazi’s. The story goes that Might Mouse originated from an idea by Izzy Klein, who originally pitched a character named Super Fly. But his boss, Paul Terry, nixed his idea, and later reintroduced Super Mouse. The character was renamed Mighty Mouse since another comic featuring a “Super Mouse” was about to be released. What a mouse. WHAT A MOUSE!

11. Garth’s Aerosmith Shirt


The awkward, soft-spoken member of the dynamic dweeb duo on Wayne’s World gave Aerosmith an extra injection of popularity with this tee. Admittedly, Garth’s was probably a bit more faded and stain-ridden. The t-shirt was thought to be given to members of a special Aerosmith fan club—Aero Force One.

10. Bart Simpson


Don’t have a cow man. It’s just your favorite spiky haired troublemaker (the one and only) Bart Simpson, whose cartoon shirts were owned by just about every 11-year-old in the 1990s. Created by cartoonist Matt Groening in 1989, Bart and his family have become one of the longest running TV series in history. They’ve stood the test of time, as we’re sure this t-shirt will, too.

9. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles


“Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! Turtles on the halfshell, turtle power!” How can you not love four butt-kicking turtles named Leonardo, Michelangelo, Donatello, and Raphael? The turtles were designed by Kevin Eastman and a fellow artist friend, Peter Laird. Likely inspired by Eastman’s summers playing with snapping turtles in Maine, they came up with the characters in their living room one night. Little did they know what a hit it would become!

8. Alvin’s A


Not only are Alvin & The Chipmunks the world’s most prolific rodent singing group, they’re also the longest living. The group made its debut with “The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don’t Be Late)” in 1958. They went on to grow an empire— winning Grammy’s, become a TV series, and most recently, staring on the big screen—all with Alvin donning his iconic “A.” Sorry Simon and Theodore, Alvin’s “A” shirt takes center stage on our list.

7. Thundercats


Spaceships? Check. Cat-like humanoid aliens fighting interstellar battles? Check. Lion-O, Cheetara, and the gang? Check. Created by Tobin Wolf, the Thundercats dominated Saturday Mornings from 1985 to 1989, and produced a sick logo t-shirt to boot. “Thunder! Thunder! Thunder! ThunderCats, HO!”—not to mention an earworm worthy theme song.

6. Bazinga!


In the winter, a t-shirt snug enough to keep warm and yet not so tight to cause perspiration. In the summer, light enough to catch the cross breeze from windows there and there. Sheldon Cooper’s comic genius immortalized in cotton. “Bazinga,” a term said by Sheldon when he’s made a joke, has become a no-joke iconic tee.

5. Legends of the Hidden Temple


Over the moat and through the Steps of Knowledge, to Olmecs head we go! Red Jaguars, Blue Barracudas, Green Monkeys, Orange Iguanas, Purple Parrots, and Silver Snakes marked competitors on Nickelodean’s Legends of the Hidden Temple. While the tees are legendary, host Kirk Fogg has said that the shirts were often stained from the pizza the kids ate at lunch. For those 90s kids who can’t seem to let go, a Legends of the Hidden Temple movie aired in 2016.

4. Mickey Mouse


Arguably everyone’s favorite mouse, Mickey was created by Walt Disney in 1929. Following his popularity, a Miami-based t-shirt company, Tropix Togs, purchased the exclusive rights to print Mickey on a shirt. Emilio Estevez wore one in “The Outsiders” and, boom, it became cool just like that.

3. I Want My MTV


Over 30 years ago, television was like the town from Footloose—void of rock music and ‘80s dancing. Enter: MTV. Over the past three decades MTV revolutionized the airwaves, creating an industry for everything from music videos to bus-based dating shows. Frank Olinsky, one of the designers of the MTV logo back in 1981, says that one of the final revisions to the logo was putting “music television” under the “M”. This was changed in 2010, when the words were removed from the logo for good.

2. Charlie Brown


While it could be easy to argue that all of the Peanuts gang t-shirts are iconic, none has the impact of the jagged look that embodies the spirit and bum luck of Good Ol’ Charlie Brown. The zig zag shirt is an icon now, but hasn’t always been Charlie’s outfit of choice. Until December 1950, he wore a plain t-shirt. But we’re sure glad he gave his look some flare.

1. Ghostbusters


“When there’s something strange in the neighborhood…who ya gonna call? Ghostbusters!” Movies, a couple animated TV series, and a bunch of video games later, the Ghostbusters franchise remains popular to this day—most recently being taken over by an all super funny, all female cast. a href=”http://www.telegraph.co.uk/films/2016/06/08/ghostbusters-meet-the-man-behind-the-logo/” target=”_blank”>Michael C. Gross, the creator of the Ghostbusters logo, has said one of the strangest places he’s seen the art is on the side of a B52 nuclear bomber during the Cold War. A war plane is cool but, we’ll take it on a t-shirt.

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We all grew up with a favorite superhero. Batman? Mighty Mouse? At CustomInk, we’re all for showing love for your favorite superheroes right on a tee. You might have seen our 100 most iconic t-shirts of all time list—we’re taking a closer look at some of the most iconic t-shirts by genre to see what really makes them cool. Our list of the top ten most iconic superhero t-shirts is super awesome, and might even inspire you to create a superhero tee of your own.

10. Punisher Skull

The ultimate antihero, The Punisher appeared for the first time in 1974 in The Amazing Spiderman comic #129. His black shirt with large white skull on the chest is so fierce, the original had bullets for teeth. The iconic skull has two origins in the comics. The first being that Punisher chose the skull while fighting in Vietnam. The second is that the skull came to him in a dream, and he uses it on his chest to distract criminals that might otherwise aim for his head.

9. Mighty Mouse


Here he comes to save the day! Airing off and on from 1942 to 1987, this super-powered rodent fought everything from alley cats to animated Nazi’s. The story goes that Might Mouse originated from an idea by Izzy Klein, who originally pitched a character named Super Fly. But his boss, Paul Terry, nixed his idea, and later reintroduced it as Super Mouse. The character was renamed Mighty Mouse since another comic featuring a “Super Mouse” was about to be released. What a mouse. WHAT A MOUSE!

8. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles


“Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! Turtles on the halfshell, turtle power!” How can you not love four butt-kicking turtles named Leonardo, Michelangelo, Donatello, and Raphael? The turtles were designed by Kevin Eastman and a fellow artist friend, Peter Laird. Likely inspired by Eastman’s summers playing with snapping turtles in Maine, they came up with the characters in their living room one night. Little did they know what a hit it would become!

7. Transformers – Autobots Logo


There’s something to robots from outer space that can turn into cars and trucks. And this Autobot logo t-shirt shows just why. From cartoon series to billion dollar movie blockbuster, these “robots in disguise” rock. Interestingly enough, the Transformers weren’t actually born from comic books—the toys came first, later leading to the comic books, cartoons, and movies we’ve come to love!

6. Green Lantern


“In brightest day, in blackest night, no evil shall escape my sight. Let those who worship evil’s might, beware my power, Green Lantern’s light!!!” -The Green Lantern Oath. The original Green Lantern, Alan Scott, was created by Martin Nodell, a writer and artist. Nodell was inspired to create the Green Lantern when he was on a subway and saw a train operator waving a lantern with a green light.

5. Thundercats


Spaceships? Check. Cat-like humanoid aliens fighting interstellar battles? Check. Lion-O, Cheetara, and the gang? Check. Created by Tobin Wolf, the Thundercats dominated Saturday Mornings from 1985 to 1989, and produced a sick logo t-shirt to boot. “Thunder! Thunder! Thunder! ThunderCats, HO!”—not to mention an earworm worthy theme song.

4. Captain America


Lone white star. Blue bullseye. Red and white rings. Step aside baseball, hot dogs, and apple pie. This is what hard-core Americana should look like. This t-shirt remains one of the more powerful patriotic expressions to capture young minds. What began as a Marvel comic has become a modern-day obsession with Marvel fans. Captain America still appears alongside the Avengers on the big screen. The t-shirt’s logo, Captain Steve Rogers’ shield himself, is his primary defense and weapon against enemies. The iconic round shield was originally more triangular, however, but was changed due to its similarity to another comic.

3. The Flash


What could be cooler than a big ol’ shiny, gold lightning bolt on your chest? Uh, running at the speed of light, thank you very much. The Flash was created by Gardner Fox and Harry Lampert, and first appeared in November 1939. In its history, 4 different people have taken on the name of the Flash. But the logo wasn’t always the lightning bolt we’ve come to recognize. The now famous bolt first appeared in 1956, when Barry Allen was the actor behind The Flash

2. Batman


Na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na, BATMAN! Ok, but seriously, it’s hard not to get excited when you see this iconic symbol. Since the Dark Knight first appeared in 1939, he’s donned a version of the Batman symbol. In the original comic, the bat didn’t even have ears or a head! It wasn’t until 1964 that the comic introduced the yellow background (1966 for movies). Today, the logo has evolved into a stealthier, buffer, if you will, version of itself. But the classic remains recognizable by all generations.

1. Superman


The literal power of this phenomenon can be seen on t-shirts everywhere and with the seemingly endless television and movie remakes in nearly every decade of Superman’s existence, this story (and t-shirt design) isn’t getting old anytime soon. First introduced in 1938, the logo has come a long way since its original, almost squiggly-looking “S”. Though different colors have been experimented with through the years, it looks like the classic red and yellow is here to stay.

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4th of July Ideas

It’s time for red, white, and blue, and maybe some BBQ, too! Have a creative and patriotic 4th of July celebration with some of our fun Independence Day activities and ideas.

Burger Cookoff
What better day to fire up the grill than July 4th? Take your backyard BBQ up a notch and invite your friends and family to participate in a burger cookoff. Have each participant bring their own meat, buns, and toppings, and see whose creation makes sparks fly! Have each person bring enough to serve 4-6 burgers, that way everyone can eat after the contest. Use small card tables to give each chef their own prep space. Set an allotted time for preparation, cooking, and assembly. It could also help to have a neighbor bring their grill over for some extra space. Establish 3 judges—mix it up and have a child as a judge, too! The top chef burger maker gets the grand prize—a gift certificate to a local burger joint!

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